Time Travel at 79 degrees (approx)

Posted by on Aug 26, 2011 in Blog Article | No Comments

I traveled through time last night, driving along Ogden Avenue in Naperville. I started my trip heading westbound at Naper Boulevard. According to the digital readerboard at the CVS the time was 7:06 and it was 79 degrees. A mile west, 7:02 (and a degree cooler) courtesy of Dick Portillo. I contemplated heading to Yorkville to play the previous night’s lotto, but once I reached Washington Street, a local bank reported it was 7:13 – the future, which by the way, is warmer…80 degrees.

Time Travel Theory 1
A wormhole exists along a section of Ogden Avenue and the micro-climates throughout the corridor may hold the key to global warming.

Time Travel Theory 2
The Vegasification of Ogden Avenue and its cheap “Lite-Brite” like signs don’t sync with a World Clock and have differing thermostats.

LITE-BRITE

Image by jasoneppink via Flickr

I’m skeptical about the need for LED readerboard signs. Forget about the fact that the resolution of these things is circa 1980. I don’t think they are needed, not all of them anyway. A bank for instance, does not need a sign with current mortgage rates. Nobody is driving their car looking for low mortgage rates, and besides, your rates are the same as everyone else’s – low. Portillo’s…seriously, “Enjoy a Milk Shake”…. this is why you wanted a sign, to get $2.35?

If I’m wrong, and a business is a blown fuse away from bankruptcy and this sign is so badly needed, we don’t need the time or the temperature. My estimate is about 99.9% of the cars on the road have clocks in them, and about 99.9% of the drivers have cell phones that tell time –  – we know what time it is. The same goes for the temperature. Plus we can look out our windshields, or better yet, roll down a window. If you are looking to do a public service, then promote a community event. The Arcada Theatre in Downtown St. Charles is promoting our August 31st Community Workshop on their marquess (and a theatre I might add, is a business that makes a good case for a readerboard sign).

I think communities are overreacting to the “need” for these signs. We are in a recession, and everybody is doing a little less business. Compromising the appearance of our commercial areas to inundate motorists with useless information is not the solution. I would argue in the case of Ogden Avenue in Naperville, that if instead of  more signs, these businesses spent a little more money on landscaping and improved the appearance and atmosphere of the corridor, Ogden would be a representative of Naperville and it would attract more business.

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