Webinar: How Geodesign is Busy Envisioning and Engaging with Your Neighborhood

Posted by on Jun 29, 2015 in Headlines | No Comments

Never before has there been such a need for planning and design professionals to anticipate future trends, propose solutions and help communities and decision makers make the wisest, most well-informed choices possible. A new design approach — one rooted in the history of design practice and enabled by rapid advances in technology — has emerged to meet that need. This approach, called geodesign, provides the framework and tools needed to explore issues from a transdisciplinary perspective and to resolve conflicts between differing points of view.

Join Houseal Lavigne Associates, PlaceWorks and Esri as they explore how geodesign and GIS technologies can increase your project success, highlighting the issues through several exciting case studies. Devin Lavigne, principal at Houseal Lavigne Associates, will provide insight into their approach to integrating procedural modeling into their design workflow, adding efficiency to their 3D production pipeline. Robert Kain, GIS manager at PlaceWorks, will share how their adoption of Web GIS and GeoPlanner has enabled them to make location-driven decisions on many of the firm’s land use planning projects. Brooks Patrick, geodesign account executive at Esri, will provide an overview of geodesign and discuss how Esri’s ArcGIS platform supports geodesign implementation.

In this webinar you will learn

  • How successful firms are adopting new GIS technologies
  • How to turn geographic data into evidence-based designs
  • Ideas for incorporating geodesign concepts for urban and landscape scenario planning

Speakers

Brooks Patrick, account executive, 3D Geodesign Markets at Esri
Devin Lavigne, principal at Houseal Lavigne Associates
Robert Kain, GIS manager at PlaceWorks
Who should attend

Landscape architects, planners, urban designers, comprehensive / regional plan managers, planning departments, directors of planning and city managers

Follow this link to Register

Register Here

You’re Doing it Wrong

Posted by on Jun 10, 2015 in Blog Article, Project Showcase | No Comments

What makes an expert?

This morning I was at the gym taking a swim. I was in a lane next to a kid, maybe 12-13 years old, who was getting coached by a young woman. As a former collegiate water polo player and high school swim coach, I noticed the woman’s coaching methods were not working for this kid. She wasn’t offering anything constructive to fix his form, and I thought to myself, “You’re doing it wrong.”

Being good at something does not necessarily make you an expert. As my husband and I watched my beloved Golden State Warriors take on the Cavs in the NBA finals, my husband mentioned how weird it was that Mark Jackson was commentating on the game. Just the year earlier he was coaching the team, and he was mediocre at best (he did, however, lead the Warriors to the playoffs for the first time in 17 years, but he also had the Splash Brothers). Jackson was a great player, but as a coach, he couldn’t lead his time to the finals. As a coach, he was doing it wrong.

Using sports analogies got me thinking: what make a planner an expert? Planners generally go to planning school where they learn about common issues, and learn strategies to solve these issues by applying planning theories. Does getting an “A” in an Economic Development class mean you’re an expert? Robert Moses and Pruitt-Igoe have shown that past “experts” did it wrong. A planner that knows a lot about planning theory and was academically successful is NOT an expert. Planning, to be successful, takes a team. We rely on community members, city staff and officials, and motivated stakeholders and community leaders. Much like Steph Curry needs Clay Thompson to be the Splash Brothers and Steve Kerr has effectively used all the players on his team, planners need a team of people, which should include other planners, to be successful. Expertise comes from a broad understanding of issues and the exchange of ideas for possible solutions.

The swim coach at the gym should have watched how other coaches work with different swimmers. She should have consulted with the kid’s parents to understand the best way to communicate with him. She cannot be a good coach without having a community of people helping her understand what coaching techniques could make this specific boy a good swimmer. Similarly with planning, without out a community-based approach that combines known planning strategies, we could not be considered experts; we’d be doing it wrong.

And on that note:

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Ticket that @s$#%&, not the cyclist…

Posted by on Jun 4, 2015 in Blog Article, HLA Blog, Uncategorized | No Comments

There is a renewed commitment within cities across the country to make it safer and more convenient to get around on a bike. Dedicated on-street bike lanes are an important component of this effort, together with strategies that include bike sharing programs, sharrows, better bike safety and awareness programs, and so on. However, once bike lanes are provided for cyclists, are they property protected for their intended use?

It is not uncommon for police to issue warnings or tickets to cyclists and skaters for riding in areas where such activity is prohibited. In fact, the ticketing of cyclists is on the rise as the popularity or urban cycling increases. However, is there a rise in the number of tickets being issued to those who obstruct the bike lanes? Maybe cities should focus their efforts on ticketing those that prevent the bike lanes from being used as intended.

In this short video, Casey Neistat humorously and painfully makes a good point regard the ticketing priorities of cities and the challenge of navigating the unintended urban obstacle course.

Enjoy…and thank you Casey.